SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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lxxx INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND EDITION
There would have been no 'appeasements', etc., and other measures would have been taken to cope with the depth of the problems involved.
It seems that the suggestions made on page 485 ff., although necessary, are not sufficient at the date of this writing, and the latest suggestions become imperative to safe-guard our future.
CONCLUSION
To summarize, under present world conditions the role of governments is becoming more and more difficult and important. With all modern complexities it is impossible for governmental men to be specialists in every field of science, and therefore they must depend on professional experts attached to the government, not only in the fields of chemistry, engineering, physics, agriculture, etc., which they already utilize; but also in anthropology, neuro-psychiatry, general semantics, and related professions. Otherwise the governments will indefinitely play the role of the blind leading the blind. It is unreasonable to wait ten or twenty years to learn by bitter experience how short-sighted and incompetent our governments have been. Why not utilize some human intelligence, proper evaluation, etc., toward which extensional methods lead, and thereby have some predictability. This is definitely an imperative, immediate need.
We should not delude ourselves. Once the psychopathological misuses of neuro-semantic and neuro-linguistic mechanisms have been so successfully introduced, they will remain with us unless reconstructive and preventive governmental measures are undertaken by experts, at once.
The conditions of the world are such today that private scientific undertakings and even professional opinions of scientific societies, or international congresses, etc., are bound to be ineffective. Only governmental interest, backing, financing, etc., can organize and enforce a serious movement for sanity, the more so since scientists, physicians, educators, and other professionals do not have the necessary time, money, authority, or even initiative to carry forward concerted plans. We have learned this group wisdom by now in the case of smallpox vaccination, control of epidemics, etc., and I venture to suggest that only such group wisdom will be effective as far as the health of our nervous systems is concerned. In terms of money certainly it would be economical to spend for preventive and permanent measures an amount even less than the cost of a single aeroplane which is made today and shot down tomorrow.
It must be sadly admitted that even professionals, no matter how prominent they may be in their narrow specialties, as individuals or spe-