SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND EDITION lxxxi
cialized groups are at present scientifically unequipped to deal with such large and complex problems as the passing from one system of orientation to another, because those whose duty it was to integrate methodologically the vast knowledge at hand, have failed. Such conditions can be remedied only by diversified methodological investigations, co-operation, and concerted action of specialists in different fields, which no private undertaking can organize effectively. The reader is referred to page 558 ff. and also to my 'Science of Man'.*
There can be little doubt that self-seeking politicians, to cover up their own tracks, will be against such scientific sanity guidance, but enlightened public opinion will sooner or later force the issues to the only possible intelligent solution.
The prevalent and constantly increasing general deterioration of human values is an unavoidable consequence of the crippling misuse of neuro-linguistic and neuro-semantic mechanisms. In general semantics we are concerned with the sanity of the race, including particularly methods of prevention; eliminating from home, elementary, and higher education inadequate aristotelian types of evaluation, which too often lead to the un-sanity of the race, and building up for the first time a positive theory of sanity, as a workable non-aristotelian system.
The task ahead is gigantic if we are to avoid more personal, national, and even international tragedies based on unpredictability, insecurity, fears, anxieties, etc., which are steadily disorganizing the functioning of the human nervous system. Only when we face these facts fearlessly and intelligently may we save for future civilizations whatever there is left to save, and build from the ruins of a dying epoch a new and saner society.
I seriously appeal to scientists, educators, medical men, especially psychopathologists, parents, and other forward-looking citizens to investigate and co-operate in urging the governments to carry out their duty to guide the people scientifically, as suggested here.
A non-aristotelian re-orientation is inevitable; the only problem today is when, and at what cost.
A. K.
Chicago, March, 1941.
Korzybski, A. The Science of Man. Amer. Jour, of Psychiatry. May, 1937