SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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52
I. PRELIMINARIES
vice versa, once these structural strivings and tendencies are formulated as such, they help to quicken and transform one period into the next one.
To the best of my knowledge, the general analysis of this most fundamental structural semantic problem of human knowledge is here formulated for the first time. It will allow, as a result, the making of human progress conscious; it will enable us to control it and so to make it uninterrupted by the painful and wasteful semantic periods of hopelessness and helplessness so characteristic of the older periods of transition.
If it is an historical fact and also a psycho-logical fact that a time-binding class of life has to have periods of development, let us have them! Let us investigate the mechanism of time-binding, of s.r, which are the dynamic factors of those changes and developments! Let us direct that development consciously, and this will lead to the elimination of unnecessary and painful panics, unrest, and the often bloody bursting of those animalistic barriers self-imposed on the dynamic class of life called 'man'.
When all is said and done, one cannot but see, at least as far as the white race is concerned, that a change from an A to a -system must be momentous. Such a change will mark the difference between a period when the mystery of 'human knowledge' was not solved and a period when it has been solved. This inherent human circular characteristic has, so far, been neurologically abused. We have not known how to handle our nervous structure. We have imposed upon and hampered human development by animalistic methods. The solving of the problems of the content of 'human knowledge' will open a new era of man as a man, leading toward proper handling of his capacities, and an era scientific in all respects, not merely in a few exact sciences. Psychologically, it will be an era of sanity, and, therefore, of human general adjustment, agreement, and co-operation. The dreams of Leibnitz will become sober reality.
The only determined attempt made, so far, to deal with the symbolic problems whose importance is emphasized in the present work is that of the Orthological Institute (10 King's Parade, Cambridge, England). This research organization, founded by C. K. Ogden, editor of 'The International Library of Psychology', is concerned with the influence of language on 'thought' in all its bearings; and it is to be hoped that further endowment may be forthcoming to enable the scope of its enquiries to be extended to include structure, non-elementalistic semantic reactions, and non-aristotelian systems. Reference to International Languages or a Universal Language will be found in the notes.1