SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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200 IV. STRUCTURAL FACTORS IN J LANGUAGES
organized men and women who, in their blissful ignorance, work in the opposite direction; and all of us pay the price.
The activities of these individuals often promulgate something similar to the well-known 'induced insanity'. Quite often paranoid or paranoiac and, more rarely, hypomanic patients can influence their immediate companions to such an extent that they join in believing in their delusions and copy their s.r. Susceptible associates begin to develop similar delusions and hallucinations and to pass through episodes themselves, perfectly oblivious to contradictions with external m.o reality. There are many paranoiac-like semantic epidemics of this kind on record. It is instructive to visit some 'meetings' and watch the performer and the audience. The pathetic side of it is that these performers, themselves not realizing the harmfulness of the situation, often pretend, or genuinely believe, that they are helping mankind by preaching some metaphysical 'morals'. What they actually produce is a disorganization of the survival-working of the human nervous system, particularly if they train the structurally undeveloped nervous system of children to delusional evaluations and s.r, and, in general, make sanity and higher and effective ethical standards very difficult or impossible. It is positively known that s.r are inextricably connected with electrical currents, secretions of different glands., which, in turn, exert a powerful influence on colloidal structure and behaviour, and so condition our neurological and physiological development. There can be no doubt that imposing delusional s.r on the undeveloped child must result in at least colloidal injury, which later on facilitates arrested development or regression, and, in general, leads away from adjustment and sanity.
Lack of space and the essentially constructive aims of the present system do not allow me to analyse many fundamental interrelations in the development of man, but a brief list, worthy of analysis, may be suggested :
1)   The relation between the pre-human reactions and the reactions of the primitive man, involving always some copying by mutants of the responses of the prevailing simpler organisms.
2)   The interrelation between the reactions of the primitive man, his animism, anthropomorphism, his other s.r and the structure of his language and semantics.
3)  The relation between the structure of primitive languages and the structure of the 'philosophical grammar' formulated by Aristotle, generally called 'logic'.
4)   The relation between this grammar, the structure of language, and the further development of our structural metaphysics and s.r.