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An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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MATHEMATICS AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEMS 291
gerated, because there are experimental data to show how through a psycho-neural training the s.r, in some cases, can be re-educated, and that with the elimination of the semantic disturbances there is a marked development of poise, balance, and a proportional increase of critical judgement, and so 'intelligence'. Idiots, imbeciles, and morons are usually 'emotional' and excitable, as well as deficient in their 'mental' processes. A similar characteristic can be found in other unclassified 'mentally' deficient, and their name is legion - a characteristic strictly connected with, and often produced by, disturbances of the s.r. When these shifting, dynamic, affective, thalamic-region, lower order abstractions are abstracted again by the higher centres, these new abstractions are further removed from the outside world and must be somehow different.
In fact, they are different; and one of the most characteristic differences is that they have lost their shifting character. These new abstractions are relatively static. It is true that one may be supplanted by another, but they do not change. In this fact lies the tremendous value and danger of this mechanism, as disclosed clearly by the disturbances of the s.r. The value is chiefly in the fact that such higher order abstractions represent a perfected kind of memory, which can be recalled exactly in the form as it was originally produced. For instance, the circle, defined as the locus of points in a plane at equal distance from a given point called the centre, remains permanent as long as we wish to use this definition. We can, therefore, recall it perfectly, analyse it., without losing the definiteness and the stability of this memory. Thus, critical analysis, and, therefore, progress, becomes possible. Compare this perfected memory, which may last indefinitely unchanged, with memories of 'emotions' which, whether dim or clear, are always distorted. We see that the first are reliable, that the others are not.
Another most important characteristic of the higher order abstractions is that, although of neural origin, they may be preserved and used over and over again in extra-neural forms, as recorded in books and otherwise. This fact is never fully appreciated from a neurological point of view. Neural products are stored up or preserved in extra-neural form, and they can be put back in the nervous system as active neural processes. The above represents a fundamental mechanism of time-binding which becomes overwhelmingly important, provided we discover the physiological mechanism of regulating the s.r, on the one hand, and discover the mechanism by which these extra-neural factors can be made physiologically effective, on the other.
If humans are characterized by the fact that they build up this cumulative affair called 'civilization', this is possible through those higher