SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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MATIIKMAT1CS AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEMS 311
bility. This will eliminate to a large extent semantic disturbances, and so the problems of sanity will be greatly helped towards solution.
To those who are accustomed to the disclaimers made by many mathematicians of human values in their work, such an analysis as I have given in the present chapter must seem unexpected. But, upon reflection, we may see that, after all, it is only a natural evaluation. Language is a unique, and, therefore, most important, human characteristic. Ought we to wonder that these linguists of exact sciences, whom we call mathematicians, should have produced unknowingly and unwittingly great human values, fundamentally affecting the s.r? They could not help it. Once they worked out their own problems properly - and no one doubts that they did it well - the results were bound to have broad human significance. Their activities were kept on the proper levels and so were naturally a help toward sanity. In Part VII, I shall discuss another mathematical discovery, known as the 'theory of mathematical types', of Russell, which, when generalized, becomes a physiological theory of enormous semantic importance and of fundamental and constant human application.
In spite of popular belief, mathematics is the simplest language in existence. Our daily language is so very complex in its structure that for many thousand years it evaded analysis. Probably, the writer, without the study of mathematics, would not have been able to discover the ultimately extremely simple yet workable principles outlined in the present work.