SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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VI. ON PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
issues clear. But, after I had formulated my -system, I read the books of Pavlov and found, to my great satisfaction, that a neurological mechanism, the analysis of which underlies my own work, and the existence of which was independently discovered by me on theoretical grounds, had been discovered by Professor Pavlov and his co-workers on experimental grounds, thus supplying additional experimental verification for my system.
It seems that the so-called 'ethics'., in general, sanity, which underlie desirable human characteristics have a definite physiological mechanism, automatically involving on psycho-logical levels these desirable semantic attitudes. It appears that some of the psycho-logical problems enormously complex and difficult to reach, or even inaccessible, are solved, not by preaching, but by the most simple and elementary physiological training, a fact which has been verified empirically. Obviously, such simplification, if at all possible, must be of fundamental importance.
Physiology deal's, in the main, with the functioning of organs in organisms, and results in various formulations. Thus, there might be an hypothetical 'physiological theory of most effective feeding', for instance, stating that food should be secured first in one's hand, or spoon, or fork, before putting it in the mouth,. A group of people who habitually disregarded the 'physiological theory' and abandoned attempts to act in accordance with it after the first unsuccessful one, would be badly underfed or would simply perish. Facts of experience show that some such 'physiological theory' must have been known and applied from time immemorial, and that, perhaps, because of it we survive at all!
How about the 'mental' field ? As I demonstrateand close observation will verify this very generallythe existing theories of 'mental' life, closely related with our linguistic habits, are A, grossly inadequate, and lead to a wholesale production of morons, imbeciles, 'emotionally' disturbed, and, in general, un-sane individuals. Investigation shows the possibility of a simple and obvious physiological theory of the use of our nervous system, which automatically leads to desirable psycho-logical, semantic states of general sanity.
In the frivolous example of a 'physiological theory of feeding' given above, the problems of order were important. In the physiological theory of sanity, order becomes paramount. Processes and function involve series of states, by necessity exhibiting order. Adjustment to life-conditions means adjustment of processes, and a physiological theory of sanity must be based structurally on four-dimensional order, where 'space' and 'time' are indivisibly interwoven.