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An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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SEMANTICS OF THE DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 597
■um of the lengths of the chords of its small subdivisions tends as the number of chords increases indefinitely and their individual lengths all approach zero uniformly. For example, the circumference of a circle is the limit approached by the perimeter of an inscribed polygon as the number of its sides increases Indefinitely, the lengths of the individual sides all approaching zero.
Similarly the length of a curve may be approximated by the sum of the lengths of segments of tangents at successive arbitrarily chosen points, merely by choosing the points nearer and nearer together. For example, the circumference of a circle is the limit approached by the perimeter of a circumscribed polygon as the number of its sides increases indefinitely, the lengths of the individual sides all approaching zero. In either case, a point on a curve taken with a vanishingly small portion of the tangent to the curve at that point may be called the lineal element of the curve.
The above definitions apply equally well in either two or three dimensions. The lineal element in two dimensions may be defined by three co-ordinates x, y, p, of which x and y are the co-ordinates of the point through which the lineal element passes and p is the slope of the element. This slope, as we already know, is to be found by differentiation, and is given by the formula p =dy/dx. In geometrical problems which relate the slope of a tangent to that of other lines, it is not the tangent that is of real importance but the lineal element. From this point of view a curve is made up of infinite numbers of vanishingly small lineal elements which are tangent to it, which is the point of view of the differential calculus. Or the curve is composed of infinite numbers of vanishingly small chords which are the sides of an inscribed polygon, which is the point of view of the integral calculus.
Obviously, in the limit, both points of view are equivalent, although as a matter of convenience they may be different. In any case, it must be obvious to the reader that using straight lines instead of pieces of a curve, or using as closer approximations arcs of circles, facilitates our study of the curves, indeed renders such study possible at all, and in practice we can carry our work to any degree of approximation we choose. But in theoretical work we require precision, hence we think in terms of infinite numbers of vanishingly small steps. The differential and integral calculus supply the only perfect technique for these processes of analysis and synthesis.
4. PERIODIC FUNCTIONS AND WAVES
We have already said that the most important relations of physics are represented by linear differential equations of the second order. It is important to know the connection of these equations with the general theory of waves or oscillations.
If on a circle of unit radius, as shown in Fig. 14, we take several points Pi, Pi, Pz, Pt, and connect these points by straight lines with the centre 0, we get angles XOP\, XOPi, . In trigonometry we define certain functions of these angles and a unit of measurement. For our purpose we will only define the so-called sine and cosine, as we have already met the definition of tangent