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An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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NOTES AND REFERENCES
In the follo-wing references the bold face numbers refer to the numbers of the literature in the bibliography; p, or, pp, indicates the page or pages; ff, indicates following pages.
In many instances the number of the page is given, but in others, when I refer to a large subject, only the number of a book or paper is indicated, and in such cases the index of the given book should be consulted.
In other cases, when no references are given, and yet the serious and educated reader may occasionally feel perplexed, may I not suggest, in this connection, that wide experience has taught me that we usually forget the structural, not entirely common, subtleties of grammar. We also often ascribe to words a very limited, personal, and habitual range of meanings, and, so, some purely linguistic difficulties appear as mysterious 'scientific' difficulties, which they are not. The reader, on such occasions, will be surprised to find what an enormous amount of knowledge may be found in a mature occasional perusal of a good grammar or dictionary, the neglect of which acts as a psycho-logical blockage to the understanding.
CHAPTER II 1 - 25. 2 - 212. 3 - 591, pp. 93, 94.
CHAPTER III
1 - The need of International Languages, or a Universal Language besides mathematics is becoming increasingly urgent. At present there are several such languages, and in many large cities there are organizations, usually called International Auxiliary Language Associations, with addresses listed in telephone directories. Any,of these organizations will gladly supply information about the whole of the international linguistic movement. There is also a number of books written on this subject to be found in the larger public or university libraries. Informations about the Basic English of Ogden as a Universal Language, consisting of the astonishingly small number of 850 words, which do the work of about 20,000 words, may be obtained from the Orthological Institute, 10 King's Parade, Cambridge, England (see also 376, 377). In my opinion, the possibilities of the Basic for a scientific civilization are unlimited, provided the Basic is revised from a non-aristotelian, non-identity, point of view.
The general and serious defect of all of these languages is, that their authors have, as yet, entirely disregarded the non-aristotelian problems of non-identity, and so of structure, without which general sanity, or the elimination of delusional worlds is entirely impossible.
CHAPTER IV 1 - 590. 2 - 579, Vol. II, Part IV, *150 ff.; 455-457. 3 - 590. 4 - 457, p. 249.
CHAPTER VII 1 - 317, 318, 319. 2 - 83.
CHAPTER VIII 1 - 92, pp. 50-52. 2 - 91, 92. 3 - 92, pp. 114, 119, 123, 242. 4 - 564, 560, pp.
16 ff., 28 ff.
CHAPTER IX 1-487. 2 - 304, 7, Vol. II, p. 461 ff. 3 - 214. 4 - 7, Vol. II, p. 457. 5 - 214, p. 210. 6 - 7, Vol. II, p. 458. 7 - 7, Vol. II, p. 251. 8 - 7, Vol. II, p. 634. 9 - 7, Vol. II, p. 944. 10 - 310, Chap. V. 11 - 364, 365-369, 540. 12 - 9, 10, 12, 13, 196, 210, 211, 370. 13 - 257, 272, 328, 345. 14 - 7, Vol. II, p. 917 ff., 273, 313, 416. 15 - 7, Vol. II, p. 690. 16 - 7, Vol. II, p. 961 ff. 17 - 7, Vol. II, p. 644 ff. 18 - 7, Vol. II, p. 803 ff. 19 - 7, Vol. II, p. 869 ff. 20 - 363. 21 - 499, 500-504, 127, 128. 22 - 201, 533. 23 - 49. 24 - 7, Vol. II, p. 59 ff.
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