SCIENCE AND SANITY - online book

An Introduction To Non-aristotelian Systems And General Semantics.

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to report science and mathematics to the general public. The reader of Korzybski's book will gain an outlook on these new fields as well as an insight into the author's contributions to the problem of identity. Brouwer challenged one of the laws of Aristotle, Korzybski challenges another."
See also P. W. BRIDGMAN, B. F. DOSTAL, R. J. KENNEDY, BER-TRAND RUSSELL, M. TRAMER, C. L. WILLIAMS, H. B. WILLIAMS.
10. MATHEMATICAL FOUNDATIONS AND LOGIC.
BERTRAND RUSSELL cables from London to the author:
"Your work is impressive and your erudition extraordinary. Have not had time for thorough reading but think well of parts read. Undoubtedly your theories demand serious consideration."
11. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS.
B.  F. DOSTAL, Professor of Mathematics, University of Florida.
"We still teach classical science on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and modern science on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, as Sir William Bragg truly said. Within the bounds of the aristotelian system there appears to be no hope of ever finding the requisite unifying principle. Mathematicians have been rapidly outgrowing the old forms of so-called logic, but mathematical physicists have in general been slow to appreciate the value of these efforts or to apply these results to their own problems. Korzybski's Science and Sanity will be of great value to science because it contains the basis for the development of a new and wider, and more unifying, form of scientific determinism, without which the outlook for modern science would be gloomy indeed. Not only does Korzybski point out a more, satisfactory, non-aristotelian, non-identity basis for a new science in general, than any hitherto employed, but he goes further in giving several promising suggestions for extensive developments and applications of the results of modern science, including those of the new wave and quantum mechanics. His work is bound to become a stimulus to investigators in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, 'psychology,' and medicine; and to educators, economists, sociologists, engineers, lawyers, and laymen as well, the majority of which still have a 'philosophy of the universe which takes one form on weekdays and another form on Sundays.'"
12. NEUROLOGY.
C.  JUDSON HERRICK, Professor of Neurology, University of Chicago.
"The disturbances of mental balance and social stability now so prevalent seem to indicate a general failure to adjust our minds to our jobs. This results in futile conflict and too often in mental and social derangement. The numberless panaceas proposed fail because each attacks a single phase of a very complex situation, and generally a particular symptom rather than the cause of the trouble. Count Korzybski has diagnosed a fundamental source of confusion in thinking and in conduct and he presents a plan for radical revamping of our theory and practice that seems worthy of further trial in a wide variety of fields. His dynamic definition of structure in terms of relations gives promise of important applications in both science and practical affairs. It provides a generally useful symbol for experience of all sorts and a technique for recasting traditional ideas and practices more efficiently. Adjustments in terms of one dominant motive (or value) are replaced by a broader (many-valued) scheme of motivation which points the way toward personal and social sanity - a way that I believe is fundamentally correct and practicable."
See also C. M. CHILD, R. S. LILLIE, M. TRAMER, W. M. WHEELER, H. B. WILLIAMS, W. H. WILMER.
13. PHYSICS.
P. W. BRIDGMAN, Professor of Physics, Harvard University.
"Of late years the realization has been growing that the ultimate source of a large fraction of the difficulties of society, civilization, and science, is verbal in char-
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