The Cure of Imperfect Sight by Treatment
Without Glasses - online book

The Original Bates Method, for correcting vision defects

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10                          Introductory
theory, which most of us learned at school, the eye changes its focus for vision at different distances by alter ing the curvature of the lens; and in seeking for an explanation for the inconstancy of the theoretically con stant error of refraction the theorists hit upon the very ingenious idea of attributing to the lens a capacity for changing its curvature, not only for the purpose of nor mal accommodation, but to cover up or to produce ac commodative errors. In hypermetropia1-commonly but improperly called farsight, although the patient with such a defect can see clearly neither at the distance nor the nearpoint-the eyeball is too short from the front backward, and all rays of light, both the convergent ones coming from near objects, and the parallel ones coming from distant objects, are focussed behind the retina, in stead of upon it. In myopia it is too long, and while the divergent rays from near objects come to a point upon the retina, the parallel ones from distant objects do not reach it. Both these conditions are supposed to be permanent, the one congenital, the other acquired. When, therefore, persons who at one time appear to have hypermetropia, or myopia, appear at other times not to have them, or to have them in lesser degrees, it is not permissible to suppose that there has been a change in the shape of the eyeball. Therefore, in the case of the disappearance or lessening of hypermetropia, we are asked to believe that the eye, in the act of vision, both at the near-point and at the distance, increases the curva ture of the lens sufficiently to compensate, in whole or in part, for the flatness of the eyeball. In myopia, on the
From the Greek hyper, over, metron. measure, and ops, the eye.