The Law Of Psychic Phenomena - online book

Bringing a scientific basis to research of the paranormal, spiritual & psychic.

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CHAPTER IV.
PERFECT MEMORY OF THE SUBJECTIVE MIND.
Confirmed by Hypnotic Phenomena. Opinions of Psychologists. Sir William Hamilton's Views. Observations of Dr. Rush. ■ Talent for Poetry and Music developed by Abnormal Conditions.
 Talent for Drawing evolved by Madness. Resuscitation of Knowledge in the Insane. Extraordinary Feats of Memory during Illness. A Forgotten Language recovered. Whole Pages of Greek and Hebrew remembered by an Illiterate Servant Girl.
 Speaking in Unknown Tongues explained. The Result of the Operations of Natural Law.
O NE of the most striking and important peculiarities o/ the subjective mind, as distinguished from the objec-tive, consists in its prodigious memory. It would perhaps be hazardous to say that the memory of the subjective mind is perfect, but there is good ground for believing that such a proposition would be substantially true. It must be understood that this remark applies only to the most profoundly subjective state and to the most favorable conditions. In all degrees of hypnotic sleep, however, the exaltation of the memory is one of the most pronounced of the attendant phenomena. This has been observed by all hypnotists, especially by those who make their experiments with a view of studying the mental action of the subject. Psychologists of all shades of belief have recognized the phenomena, and many have declared their conviction that the minutest details of acquired knowledge are recorded upon the tablets of the mind, and that they only require favorable conditions to reveal their treasures.