The Law Of Psychic Phenomena - online book

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Il6        THE LAW OF PSYCHIC PHENOMENA.
exactly in the right spot, and precisely as if the two partners were one.
" How comes this? One horse is being steered by physical power and science only; the other by a wonderful force, which joins together in one two minds and two bodies.
" Now, see the test. Yonder waves a line of willows, and both riders know that the biggest and nastiest water jump in the county is ahead of them. Both equally mean to get over; but if they do, it will be in two different fashions : the one will compel his horse to jump it by sheer physical force ; the other will jump it, if it is jumpable at all, as the ' senior partner' of the animal he bestrides. Down they go, sixty yards apart, and each, say, has picked a place which it is only just possible for a horse to cover; neither horse can turn his head; for, at the last stride, the velvet hands have become grips of iron. Splash goes Number i; he went as far as he could: but that last two feet wanted just an impetus which was absent. How about Number 2 ? The rider has fixed his eye, and his mind with it, on yonder grassy spot on the other side of the water, and, sure enough, the fore-feet are simply ' lifted' into it by something inward, not outward ; but only the fore-feet. Still, the calculation of the strung-up mind has entered into that, the stirrups have been cast loose in the ' fly,' and the moment the hoofs touch the bank, the rider is over his horse's head, with reins in hand ; a second more, the horse is beside him; yet another, and they are away forward, without losing more than a minute.
" Assheton Smith expressed in some manner but only in some manner what I mean in his well-known dictum, ' Throw your heart over a fence, and your horse is sure to follow.'
" I could give hundreds of instances and anecdotes of this magnetic power of the rider over the horse, but one will suffice to prove my point.
" I was out for a ride one day with an argumentative friend along the road, and was on a very celebrated old hunter that had been my friend and partner for many a season. We were talking on this subject, and my friend scoffed at the very idea of such a thing as a sort of visionary nonsense. A hundred yards ahead there was an intersecting cross-road, at right angles to that on which we were riding. I pulled up my horse.
"'Now,' I said, 'look here; I will prove my theory to you. Choose and tell me which of these roads my horse shall take. You shall ride three lengths behind me; I will throw the reins on his neck, and I will bet you a sovereign he goes the way I will him; and you shall be the judge whether it is possible for