The Dictionary Of Photography

A True Historic Record Of The Art & Practice Of Photography 100 Years Ago.

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Hydroquinone
and refuse to believe that quinol is as good ; whereas many others state that it is decidedly preferable. For some con-ditions of work it undoubtedly is far superior to pyro. The number of formulae given is enormous, almost every worker seemingly suggesting some slight modification. The author has made a great number of experiments, and believes that with the following formulae good results can always be obtained. For negative work : -
No. I.
Quinol..................154 grs.
Sodium sulphite (pure recryst.) ... ... 154 ..
Sulphurous acid          ... ... ... ... 17 mins.
Distilled water, to make ... ... ... 10 ozs.
Dissolve the sulphite in the water and add the acid, and lastly
the quinol.
No. 2. Sodium carbonate (pure) ... ... ... 1300 grs.
Potassium hydrate (caustic potash in sticks) 154 .. Distilled water, to make ... ... ... 10 ozs.
For use mix equal parts of each, and dilute with twice or three times the quantity of water. About 4 drms. of each will be ample for a ^-plate which has received a normal exposure. The image should make its appearance in about thirty to forty-five seconds, and development be completed in four or five minutes. For under-exposure soak the plate first in the accelerator for one minute, and then add the quantity of No. 1. For over-exposure add 1 drm. of a 10 per cent, solution of sodium sulphite, or 5 mins. of bromide of potassium, and reduce the quantity of accelerator No. 2. The following mode of preparing the developer is satisfactory.
No. 1.
Quinol............... ... 4 grs.
Sodium sulphite (cryst.) ......... 24 ,,
Distilled water............... 1 oz.
No. 2.
Potassium bromide ...... ...... 60 grs.
Distilled^water, to make 10 drms. of solution.
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