The Dictionary Of Photography

A True Historic Record Of The Art & Practice Of Photography 100 Years Ago.

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Retouching
now dust the superfluous powder off, and it is ready for work. The amateur retoucher had better begin by using lead pencil, a Faber's or Hardtmuth's HHHH or HHHHHH being perhaps the most suitable, and the point should be sharpened in the following manner: - The pencil point should always be kept very sharp by rubbing on fine emery paper. Now touch the abraded surface over the pinhole in a circular manner till the hole is no longer visible. It is as well after several pinholes have been retouched to take a print from the same to see whether they show or not. Instead of the cuttle-fish advised above, any of the following matt varnishes may be used: -
Amber resin... ... ... ... ... 10 grs.
Benzole         ... ... ... ... ... i oz.
Dissolve, and allow to subside for twenty-four hours before use.
Gum dammar          ... ... ... ... 10 grs.
Canada balsam ... ... ... ... .5 ,,
Turpentine ... ... ... ... ... 1 oz.
Or
Sandarac ......... ... ... 6 grs.
Shellac         ... ... ... ... ... 36 ..
Mastic           ...............36 ..
Ether            ... ... ... ... ... 12 drms.
Dissolve, and add
Benzole         ... ... ... ... ... 2 drms.
To retouch for broad effects Professor Fritz Luckhardt adopts the plan of covering the back of the glass with collodion slightly tinted with a colouring material. When dry the film is scraped away where not wanted ; that is to say, where one wishes the negative to print with full vigour. A layer of matt varnish slightly tinted may now be applied, and a second scraping away to suit the subject can be performed. Shading with blacklead powder applied with a stump, and partial masking with fine tissue paper, may come in at this stage, while the paper may form a fresh basis upon which blacklead work may be done. A few drops of aurantia solution in alcohol may be added to plain collodion or matt varnish as purchased or prepared, so as to give the required depth of tint; but in the case of all con-siderable operations at the back of the negative, trial prints should frequently be made.
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