PSYCHOTHERAPY SCIENTIFIC AND RELIGIOUS

A Broad Perspective on Mental Healing

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vi                   THE ANATOMY OF HUMAN PERSONALITY               267
ence, and this, however, loses its force if the independence of almost the whole of consciousness with regard to the body has been shown to be also a fact of experience.'
A view which approximates closely to, and casts light upon, the religious conception of immortality, is that set forth by McDougall I5° (p. 372): 'Though it is not possible to say just how much of what we call personality is rooted in bodily habit and how much in psychical dispositions, yet it is open to us to believe that the soul, if it survives the dissolution of the body, carries with it some large part of that which has been gained by intellectual and moral effort \ He goes on to say that in connection with the future life it is conceivable that the soul might ' find other conditions (possibly in association with some other bodily organism) a sphere for the application and actualization of the capacities developed in it during its life in the body \
In a work I54a (pp. 272-73) published shortly before his death McDougall, defending the dualistic theory of the body-mind relationship combined with some form of mon-adism, claims ' that it makes intelligible the existence of individuals or persons higher than and more comprehensive than ourselves, the wholes of which we are subordinate members, and in the lives of which we may play some part without being aware of the fact \ This theory is advantageous both ethically and religiously ; ' because it gives us a glimpse of an intelligible possibility of the continuance of the activity of each one of us beyond the death of the body, and hence of the continuing influence of whatever of positive value in our personalities may have accrued from our individual efforts'. He adds that there are a number of empirical indications of the reality of such individuals. He points here to ' moral, aesthetic, and religious experiences, too vague and uncertain of