PSYCHOTHERAPY SCIENTIFIC AND RELIGIOUS

A Broad Perspective on Mental Healing

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33°        PSYCHOTHERAPY : SCIENTIFIC AND RELIGIOUS chap.
house somewhat like a castle with trees around it, which, for her, meant peace.
On the following week the painting produced represented herself carefully dressed in a white frock sitting on a chair with a hand mirror into which she was anxiously looking. In front of her was a vase of flowers and beyond that a closed door. Behind her and almost outside the picture a hand was stretched forward holding hers, her fiance's hand.
On the next visit she produced Fig. 2, and explained that the rainbow meant hope. When questioned about Watt's ' Hope ' she replied that she was not conscious of it while painting.
She is now happy, back at work, having no time for further painting, looking forward to marriage and no longer needing help.
Analysis has sometimes been criticised on the ground of the length of time it takes, and this is, indeed, one of the great differences between strict psychoanalysis and other systems. It rarely lasts less than six months and is often continued for several years, the patient attending four or five times weekly. Others confine the treatment to a shorter period.
However, it must be admitted that some of the prejudice against the long periods occupied by treatment is justified only when its continuation is without critical regard as to how far it is being valuable. Here it might be remembered that, although the limitations of psychotherapy are fairly well defined, it is often only possible to make a correct diagnosis when the patient is on the road to recovery. It is possibly in a minority of instances that the anlayst is able to say before the treatment has proceeded a considerable distance whether it is likely to be of assistance or not. Freud says, in dealing with this point: ' Now it would be perfectly legitimate to save oneself